International Day of Persons with Disabilities

3 December 2019

The UN celebrate this day every year on 3 December and the theme for this year is ‘Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership‘. Their aim is to ensure that all are treated equally and to make the world a more inclusive place.

Libraries have many different ways of being inclusive to all, some of those being dyslexia friendly books, large print, audiobooks and braille books.

Booktrust have created a list of books to read with your children and these are some of the few that we have on our library catalogue:

Song for a whale / Lynne Kelly.

Iris was born deaf, but she’s never let that define her; after all, it’s the only life she’s ever known. And until recently she wasn’t even very lonely, because her grandparents are both deaf, too. But Grandpa has just died and Grandma’s not the same without him. The only place Iris really feels at home anymore is in her electronics workshop where she loves taking apart antique radios. Then, during a science lesson about sound waves, Iris finds out about a whale who is unable to communicate with other whales. The lonely whale awakens something in Iris. She’s determined to show him that someone in the world knows he’s there.

Lightning chase me home / Amber Lee Dodd.

Amelia McLeod lives on a tiny Scottish island, her mum has walked out on her and she’s about to start at a whole new, scary school. Her dyslexia means she’s a target for the school bullies. When she makes a wish on her birthday to be reunited with her mum, she finds herself quite literally disappearing at times of stress and reappearing elsewhere on the island, where she finds clues and snapshots of her parents’ past.

Amazing / Steve Antony.

A little boy and his pet dragon are the very best of friends. They laugh, they sing, they dance, they snooze. They are both amazing – just like everyone else! A celebration of friendship and being yourself with a positive message about celebrating diversity.

Me and my sister / Rose Robbins.

This appealing brother and sister duo spend a lot of their day together, eating meals, going to school and playing. But life with an autistic sibling is not always easy. Through the eyes of the brother, we find out how they are both very different, but also very similar in other ways, and come what may they have lots of fun together and love each other just the same. This is a touching book that will strike a chord with every family with siblings, especially where one is differently abled.

Can you see me? : expected to fit in, proud to stand out / Libby Scott & Rebecca Westcott.

People think that because Tally’s autistic, she doesn’t realise what they’re thinking, but Tally sees and hears – and notices – all of it. Endearing, insightful and warmly uplifting, this is a story of autism, empathy and kindness that will touch readers of all ages.

National Inclusion Week

23 – 29 September 2019

National Inclusion Week highlights the huge importance of inclusion in not only the workplace, but in society as well. Many employers use it as a time to get connected and engage with their colleagues and talk more about inclusion. You can use the week to organise events and activities in your own workplace or community.

How are libraries inclusive?

Libraries are a place for the community. For all people, from all walks of life to come together to learn, socialise and have access to resources. Libraries are a safe space where someone can spend a whole day without question and borrow books and so much more!

Libraries also hold stock that is inclusive to all. We have audiobooks in CD and playaway format, large print books, braille books and books designed for those with Dyslexia. There is so much to choose from!

Facts and figures

  • We are part of Hampshire County Council’s Culture, Communities and Business Services department.
  • Hampshire Libraries hold over 2 million items of stock and receive over 6 million visits a year. In addition over 15% of issues and renewals are carried out online.
  • Every library has both public computers and WiFi, providing free access to the internet.

Standards and values

  • We will engage with customers, putting them at the centre of relevant and high quality services.
  • Contribute to the health and wellbeing of our communities by providing a safe environment and inspiring people to read, learn and access information.
  • Provide equal access for everyone and embrace digital technologies to enhance our diverse range of services.

Hampshire Libraries booklist

Why are people different colours? : big issues for little people around identity and diversity / written by Dr Emma Waddington + Dr Christopher McCurry For children aged 4 – 8

This revolutionary series, written by two child psychologists, provides the perfect platform to explore a broad range of family issues and questions that children have as they grow up and try to make sense of the world around them. Each illustrated spread poses important, commonly-asked questions around diversity and cultural identity, which help children to discuss their feelings and understand others as they become aware of people of different ages, cultures and appearance. Includes explanations and advice for parents and carers throughout.

Pride : the story of the LGBTQ equality movement / Matthew Todd

In June 1969, police raided New York gay bar the Stonewall Inn. Pride charts the events of that night, the days and nights of rioting that followed, the ensuing organization of local members of the community – and the 50 years since in which activists and ordinary people have dedicated their lives to reversing the global position. Pride documents the milestones in the fight for equality, from the victories of early activists, to the gradual acceptance of the LGBTQ+ community in politics, sport and the media and the passing of legislation barring discrimination. Covering the key figures and notable moments, events and breakthroughs of the movement through the reproduction of rare images and documents, and featuring personal testimony essays from notable figures, Pride is a unique and comprehensive account of the ongoing challenges facing the LGBTQ community, and a celebration of the equal rights that have been won for many as a result of the sacrifices and passion of this mass movement. 

Let her fly : a father’s journey and the fight for equality / Ziauddin Yousafzai with Louise Carpenter.

In this intimate and extraordinary memoir, Ziauddin Yousafzai, the father of Malala, gives a moving account of fatherhood and his lifelong fight for equality – proving there are many faces of feminism. “Whenever anybody has asked me how Malala became who she is, I have often used the phrase. Ask me not what I did but what I did not do. I did not clip her wings'” For over twenty years, Ziauddin Yousafzai has been fighting for equality – first for Malala, his daughter – and then for all girls throughout the world living in patriarchal societies. Taught as a young boy in Pakistan to believe that he was inherently better than his sisters, Ziauddin rebelled against inequality at a young age. And when he had a daughter himself he vowed that Malala would have an education, something usually only given to boys, and he founded a school that Malala could attend. Then in 2012, Malala was shot for standing up to the Taliban by continuing to go to her father’s school, and Ziauddin almost lost the very person for whom his fight for equality began. Let Her Fly is Ziauddin’s journey from a stammering boy growing up in a tiny village high in the mountains of Pakistan, through to being an activist for equality and the father of the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, and now one of the most influential and inspiring young women on the planet.

Sam and Ruby’s Olympic adventure / Tony Bradman

Ruby and Sam are given an ultimatum by their teacher: either they present a project on the Olympic Games or they will not be allowed to go on their school trip. Creating a time machine, using Sam’s spare wheelchair, they travel from the beginning of the Olympics in Athens to the Beijing Olympics of 2008.

Presented in a Dyslexia friendly format.